‌ ‌Early‌ ‌Islamic‌ ‌Attitudes‌ ‌Towards‌ ‌Christians‌ ‌and‌ ‌Jews‌ ‌in‌ ‌The‌ ‌Pact‌ ‌of‌ ‌Umar,‌ ‌the‌ ‌Treaty‌ ‌of‌ ‌Tudmir‌ ‌and‌ ‌the‌ ‌Qur’an‌ ‌

 ‌From‌ ‌the‌ ‌titular‌ ‌sources‌ ‌used‌ ‌as‌ ‌readings,‌ ‌it‌ ‌is‌ ‌evident‌ ‌that‌ ‌early‌ ‌Islamic‌ ‌attitudes‌ ‌towards‌ ‌Christians‌ ‌and‌ ‌Jews‌ ‌was‌ ‌of‌ ‌tolerance‌ ‌of‌ ‌their‌ ‌right‌ ‌to‌ ‌take‌ ‌a‌ ‌different‌ ‌course‌ ‌of‌ ‌religious‌ ‌belief,‌ ‌however‌ ‌condemning‌ ‌of‌ ‌their‌ ‌path‌ ‌of‌ ‌faith‌ ‌as‌ ‌being‌ ‌skewed‌ ‌from‌ ‌the‌ ‌will‌ ‌of‌ ‌god,‌ ‌and‌ ‌thus‌ ‌of‌ ‌lesser‌ ‌value.‌ ‌ ‌ ‌Evidence‌ ‌of‌ ‌Islamic‌ ‌disagreement‌ ‌with‌ ‌Christian‌ ‌and‌ ‌Jewish‌ ‌faith‌ ‌is‌ ‌presented‌ ‌in‌ ‌the‌ ‌Qu’ran‌ ‌in‌ ‌which‌ ‌unbelievers‌ ‌of‌ ‌the‌ ‌Islamic‌ ‌faith‌ ‌are‌ ‌described‌ ‌as‌ ‌scoffing‌ ‌at‌ ‌the‌ ‌faithful‌ ‌Muslims‌ ‌whilst‌ ‌being‌ ‌enamoured‌ ‌with‌ ‌life,‌ ‌and‌ ‌thus‌ ‌deserving‌ ‌a‌ ‌lower‌ ‌place‌ ‌on‌ ‌the‌ ‌day‌ ‌of‌ ‌reckoning.‌ ‌This‌ ‌disagreement‌ ‌of‌ ‌faith‌ ‌is‌ ‌furthered‌ ‌by‌ ‌Jesus‌ ‌being‌ ‌described‌ ‌as‌ ‌a‌ ‌messenger‌ ‌like‌ ‌Muhammed,‌ ‌rejecting‌ ‌the‌ ‌Christian‌ ‌notion‌ ‌of‌ ‌the‌ ‌Holy‌ ‌Trinity.‌ ‌ ‌ ‌Islamic‌ ‌tolerance‌ ‌towards‌ ‌“unbelievers”‌ ‌is‌ ‌however‌ ‌represented‌ ‌in‌ ‌the‌ ‌Qu’ran‌ ‌in‌ ‌which‌ ‌Christian‌ ‌and‌ ‌Jewish‌ ‌faith‌ ‌is‌ ‌likened‌ ‌to‌ ‌Islamic‌ ‌faith‌ ‌as‌ ‌they‌ ‌all‌ ‌humble‌ ‌themselves‌ ‌before‌ ‌God‌ ‌and‌ ‌value‌ ‌God’s‌ ‌revelations‌ ‌and‌ ‌thus‌ ‌deserve‌ ‌some‌ ‌recompense.‌ ‌In‌ ‌the‌ ‌Treaty‌ ‌of‌ ‌Tudmir,‌ ‌tolerance‌ ‌is‌ ‌reflected‌ ‌through‌ ‌the‌ ‌peaceful‌ ‌relations‌ ‌taken‌ ‌out‌ ‌in‌ ‌the‌ ‌seizing‌ ‌of‌ ‌Spain‌ ‌in‌ ‌which‌ ‌treaties‌ ‌with‌ ‌local‌ ‌leaders‌ ‌allowed‌ ‌people‌ ‌of‌ ‌non-islamic‌ ‌faith‌ ‌autonomy‌ ‌and‌ ‌the‌ ‌right‌ ‌to‌ ‌practice‌ ‌non-Islamic‌ ‌faith.‌ ‌ ‌ ‌Unbelievers‌ ‌being‌ ‌viewed‌ ‌as‌ ‌of‌ ‌lesser‌ ‌value‌ ‌within‌ ‌this‌ ‌tolerance‌ ‌is‌ ‌reflected‌ ‌through‌ ‌the‌ ‌security‌ ‌being‌ ‌provided‌ ‌to‌ ‌Christians‌ ‌in‌ ‌Islamic‌ ‌society‌ ‌being‌ ‌dependant‌ ‌on‌ ‌abiding‌ ‌to‌ ‌what‌ ‌is‌ ‌deemed‌ ‌appropriate‌ ‌by‌ ‌Muhammad’s‌ ‌speakings,‌ ‌rather‌ ‌than‌ ‌what‌ ‌is‌ ‌deemed‌ ‌acceptable‌ ‌in‌ ‌Christian‌ ‌belief‌ ‌(The‌ ‌Pact‌ ‌of‌ ‌Umar).‌ ‌The‌ ‌view‌ ‌of‌ ‌lesser‌ ‌value‌ ‌is‌ ‌furthered‌ ‌by‌ ‌statements‌ ‌in‌ ‌the‌ ‌Qu’ran‌ ‌of‌ ‌associations‌ ‌with‌ ‌others‌ ‌ideally‌ ‌being‌ ‌with‌ ‌those‌ ‌of‌ ‌Islamic‌ ‌faith‌ ‌rather‌ ‌than‌ ‌an‌ ‌“idolator”,‌ ‌stating‌ ‌that‌ ‌they‌ ‌should‌ ‌not‌ ‌be‌ ‌taken‌ ‌as‌ ‌allies,‌ ‌as‌ ‌their‌ ‌transgressions‌ ‌from‌ ‌Muslim‌ ‌faith‌ ‌allude‌ ‌to‌ ‌them‌ ‌not‌ ‌being‌ ‌guided‌ ‌by‌ ‌God.‌ ‌The‌ ‌ideas‌ ‌brought‌ ‌forth‌ ‌by‌ ‌these‌ ‌readings‌ ‌allude‌ ‌to‌ ‌early‌ ‌Islamic‌ ‌attitudes‌ ‌towards‌ ‌unbelievers‌ ‌being‌ ‌of‌ ‌tolerance‌ ‌whilst‌ ‌disagreeing‌ ‌with‌ ‌their‌ ‌faith‌ ‌and‌ ‌viewing‌ ‌it‌ ‌as‌ ‌making‌ ‌them‌ ‌of‌ ‌lesser‌ ‌value.‌ ‌about:blankabout:blank

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